Protect Your Online Image

The internet is a wild and dangerous place when you don’t know how to treat it with respect. Many folks who have grown up with the internet look at it like it is a utility that has always been there and thus is infinitely safer to use. Those of us who came before the internet was prevalent know better. That is why Status Labs CEO Darius Fisher is making such a killing as one of the leaders in online reputation management. Fisher came into popularity thanks to his steadfast support of internet privacy rights and now he is dropping tips on how to keep you safe online.

Fisher starts by saying that you need to keep your personal data as far away from the internet as possible. Whether you intend to become a public figure in the future or merely don’t want your public dealings on the internet, you need to focus on how you are being represented. Contact websites that host your personal data and request that it be removed. Go ahead and lock down social media accounts by initiating high privacy standards. Whatever you need to do in order to curtail your digital breadcrumb trail is necessary.

Next you need to get into the habit of searching yourself on various web search engines, like Google and Bing. Look up keywords related to your name or your popular email and then see what starts coming up. You need to be aware of what information is getting leaked out in order to put a stop to it. Once you have an idea as to what info is out there you can begin to start nail down the hatches even tighter around you.

Finally you need to be prepared to take action in case something does go wrong with your image on the internet. That is where Status Labs would come into play. Status Labs specializes in getting ahead of digital PR quagmires by helping steer the flow of conversation. CEO Darius Fisher has years of experience with public officials, private citizens, and celebrities from just about all over the globe.

More information for Status Labs:

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/status-labs-new-york-team-relocates-to-larger-manhattan-office-300252243.html

What Actually is The US Money Reserve Penny

For the past several years, it has been a question on whether or not the penny has any real value. Phil Diehl who is the former Director of the U.S. Mint and the current president of coin distributor U.S. Money Reserve, is completely against the production of the penny.

Mr. Diehl explained on CNBC Squawk Box that he believes that the penny costs too much to produce for what it is actually worth. The cost of producing one penny which is one cent is 1.8 cents which equates to millions of dollars that is lost to making pennies annually.

Mr. Diehl has received several protests against eliminating the penny. One argument is the fact that the elimination of the penny could lead to inflation of the United States’ economy. In response to this argument, Mr. Diehl states that this has been a concern for the past 25 years by penny lobbyists to keep the penny.

Mr. Diehl then continues with a counter argument that in present day 75 percent of all transactions are now through electronic devices such as apps and credit cards. The remaining 25 percent of cash transactions would not be hugely affected by raising or lowering the prices of products due to the elimination of the penny.

Mr. Diehl continues by stating that in response to the elimination of the penny companies would likely round the prices down rather than round up. This action would be done to keep the customers happy instead of aggravating them with an increase in the product price.

Those who want to protect the penny include private interest groups that make the penny blanks. Among these private interests groups are the zinc lobbyists that produce 97.5 percent of what the penny is made out of. In addition to this, a private interest group called American’s for Common Cents has continued to protect the idea of the penny.

The argument that this group uses is that organizations such as charities would be negatively affected because there would be less pocket change donated to organizations. In addition to this, the idea of “rounding tax” would negatively affect consumers.

Mizzou Professor Melissa Click Aims to Reform Image

The internet can be called the great equalizer for a ton of reasons. It gives a voice to the oppressed and makes it possible to spread information faster than ever before in history. Unfortunately the internet can also be abused and an ill timed poor moment can go viral, thus marking you for the rest of your life. Missouri Professor Melissa Click found this out first hand when an ill phrased remark was recorded before quickly going viral on the internet.

The setting was a frantic and loud student protest occurring on campus at the University of Missouri. Student journalists and other national reporters were on location to capture the events. Melissa Click, standing between the protesters and journalists, apparently lost her temper when a journalist kept pushing in on her. Click called for ‘muscle’ to help remove the journalist and the scene only escalated from there. The remarks did not land well when they were replayed millions of times on the internet and the professor soon found herself suspended and fired, pending an investigation.

Since the fateful day Click has seen her life dragged through the mud by various politicians and organizations. While her remarks were, without a doubt, terrible are they really the sort of words that should ruin an otherwise spotless 12 year career? Click certainly doesn’t think so and that’s why she quickly turned for help to the Texas based PR firm, Status Labs.

CEO Darius Fisher is a staunch supporter of our right to privacy and so he stood up for the Ashley Madison members even when nobody else would. In that same vein we see that Status Labs is supporting Click, another embattled individual who may be getting the short end of the stick in regards to public relations.

Darius Fisher believes that Click is being unfairly prosecuted and he is working at the forefront to spearhead a PR overhaul for Melissa Click. It remains to be see if Click will save her job, however.